Learn Japanese: Animal Sounds Part 1

October 15, 2008 by admin · 25 Comments 

One Minute Japanese: Animal Sounds Part I

Cat: nya-nya-
Dog: wan wan
Pig: bu-bu-

Duration : 0:1:24

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Let’s Learn Japanese Basic 1: “I’m Yan” [Episode 1, Part A]

August 19, 2008 by admin · 25 Comments 

Episode 1, Part A of Let’s Learn Japanese Basic 1.

THE 3 PDF’S OF THE TEXTBOOK ARE INCLUDED IN THE TORRENT, LIKE I SAID ON MY CHANNEL. HERE’S THE DIRECT LINK TO THAT TORRENT(has all episodes from both series and the textbook, and you can choose the ones you do and don’t want to download):

http://cache.torrentspy.com/download.asp?id=793449

Now please stop bothering intelsilver.

Anyways, good luck in your quest of learning the Japanese language, but before you begin, here’s just a little warning of what you’ve gotten yourself into:

http://pepper.idge.net/japanese/

Duration : 0:9:57

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Is Learning Japanese Really That Difficult and What Type of Person Does It?

August 3, 2008 by admin · Leave a Comment 

Is learning Japanese really that difficult and what type of person does it?

The answer to the first question is "Yes". For most Westerners coming from one of the romance family languages Japanese is going to be more difficult languages to master than say, Eskimo. Regardless of what you’ve heard, regardless of what you’ve read and regardless of how many "Learn Japanese in your toilet time" book titles you’ve seen at Kinokuniya, the Japanese language is extremely hard to handle for most of the Gaijin world. Not content with a perfectly good alphabet in hiragana the Japanese have four alphabets (if you include romaji) and two systems of pronunciation, multiple interpretations, with the same kanji character. Then there is the distinct speaker – listener status that is specific to the Japanese language. These are all factors that can guarantee you’ll have a harder time learning this language than perhaps even Chinese.
So given that learning Japanese is some kind of bizarre masochism what kind of a person undertakes a lifetime commitment to working around the subtitles of a language based in hidden convention and working out all those little squiggles. Without being overly stereotypical there are two distinct groups.

The first group of learners pick up the language along the way and can often found in load boisterous izakayas having a riot and speaking very bad Japanese. Surprisingly these people are actually excellent communicators. They always have a huge circle of friends and appear to have a secure happy out going nature. However they are often frowned upon by the second group for their poor Kanji ability and less than serious attitude. The second group can usually be determined by a slightly geeky appearance and mis-shaped cranium. Obesity and baldness are also a common factor. They take great pride in their Japanese Kanji ability collecting Kanji in a similar fashion to a train spotter collecting train identification numbers yet they remain ignorant of how the transport system essentially works.. Usually the study of Kanji starts during high school or undergraduate life at university as they become socially isolated. Finding recognition in Japan they sadly are still unable to express themselves normally or communicate thoughts meaningfully. These people have a small circle of friends, usually Japanese who are forced to work together with them. There is a high correlation between members of this group and having Japanese partners who are inept.
Yet the western Japanese speaker remains a select group. There are only about 2.5 million student who study Japanese in institutions: 1.5 million being Korean and Chinese, 300,000 Australians, 150,000 Americans and around 200,000 Europeans. Although these figures refer to millions of people they are extremely small in comparison to German or Spanish.

Depending on your language learning skills, on the quality of your teachers, courses, books and the amount of time you spend on learning Japanese, it could take you between 2 and 3 years to make a basic dent in the language. That is an investment of about fifteen thousand dollars and a lot of time. Obviously living and working in Japan facilitates the learning experience yet sadly for many of the second group, the geeks, as much as they wish to become Japanese they will always be outsiders. But being anal, this will not occur to them for a further decade. As for the first group, they’re to busy to worry about this fact and rarely care.
At some point the Japanese Language learner will want to sit the Japanese language Proficiency Test (JLPT) or Japanese External Trade Organization (JETRO) administered by the Japanese Government. These tests are not cheap and not for the faint of hearted. Significantly, the first group of boisterous party goers will not study until the last few days, although they may carry a text book around and talk about it dismayingly, they rarely open it. In contrast the second group is by nature extremely studious and live to tell all and sundry exactly how hard they study, and just how hard that study is. Finally both groups have a deep inner desire to integrate into Japanese society and at times this illusion may seem attainable. But the truth is no matter how long they live in Japan they will always be Gaijin, because exclusion is intrinsic to the society they love so much.

buy Instant Immersion Japanese Deluxe cheap price

March 16, 2008 by admin · Leave a Comment 

buy Instant Immersion Japanese Deluxe cheap price

Education:Languages Instant Immersion Japanese Deluxe TOPICS Entertainment CS203S The #1 Best Selling Language Product Worldwide! Product Information Millions of people worldwide have discovered the value of Instant Immersion™ , the most effective program available for learning to speak a

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Japanese Proverb for learning English

November 5, 2007 by admin · Leave a Comment 

The nail that stands out will be hammered down.

Duration : 1 min 20 sec

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lets learn Japanese lesson 3

July 16, 2007 by admin · Leave a Comment 

This is the third lesson. if you want more just e-mail me and I will get you more. if you want the book to go along with the lessons, again, send me a message and i will e-mail it to you. God bless you and your entire family

Duration : 29 min 35 sec

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Let's Learn Japanese Basic 03 – There's a cat

February 6, 2007 by admin · Leave a Comment 

Learning Japanese has never been easier! There are 52 episodes (2 seasons) so look out while I upload them! Just so you know these were made back in the 80's.

Duration : 29 min 35 sec

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Using A Learn Yoga CD-ROM Is Ideal For Beginners Yoga

December 3, 2006 by admin · Leave a Comment 

In today’s modern world of computers it is quite easy to look for information about yoga exercise to enable you to decide exactly which yoga posture and yoga exercise you want to practice. You have no need to find a yoga class just pop in a cd-rom and follow the instructions. Two excellent yoga exercise cd-roms are Wellness Yoga and Shiatsu Relaxation. Lithe young women demonstrate these ancient Eastern techniques while mellow-voiced narrators speak over somnambulant music, the better to relax you and make you all well.

Most of us are familiar at least with the concepts of yoga, its slow stretching exercises and its often almost unattainable physical positions. Wellness Yoga is a nicely designed program that packages 74 asanas, or positions, into several packages such as the Quick and Easy Course, the Beauty Course and the Health Course.

The program consists largely of what it calls procedure screens, in which each position is demonstrated in one window while described textually in another. A narrator reads that same text aloud. In addition to the usual tape-recorder buttons to pause, stop and restart the action, there is a graph that displays the approximate duration of each segment of the routine.

The practical difficulties of using this CD-ROM are fairly obvious. The manual, dragged kicking and screaming into English from its Japanese roots, advises the user to First practice forming the pose while watching the screen and try memorizing the whole procedure.” This, unless you have a 24-inch monitor or keep your monitor on the floor, is likely to be difficult. Clearly the actual learning of the poses could be more readily done with a videotape.

On the other hand, you can hunt around in the CD-ROM, choose from the positions you want to learn, and collect them into personal groups. And maybe you’ve got a really big monitor, and a cordless, long-distance mouse.

This is a nice program, well-made and instructive. My only complaint is that it does not emphasize clearly enough that unless you are as slender as the model executing the poses, you are not going to be able to do many of them — the Crow, the Heron and the Frog, for instance — correctly. On the other hand, we can all do the Corpse.

Shiatsu Relaxation, which teaches a massage technique clearly related to acupuncture, is another kettle of fish.

The theory is that rubbing, kneading or poking specific points on the body, called acupressure points, will make other parts of the body feel better. I am not prepared to argue that premise, but the entire procedure seems shiatsu yourself is not clear, either; the program initially suggests you find some of your own more accessible pressure points, but they are not all available to your own hands and all the demonstrations show one person ministering to another.

Perhaps one of yoga’s major attractions is that it combines physical and mental exercise. It is excellent for posture and flexibility, both key physical elements for most sports-people, and in some respects, there are strength benefits to be gained. Yoga teachers say that the approach of yoga therapy is one of the most effective ways of achieving the mental edge that athletes seek.